Categorisation

Choose the classification system you would like to use:

Page Information

8,534

Language and Communication Understand and use pronouns he and she  This resource has been viewed by a moderator.

Description:

Child will understand the pronouns 'he' and 'she' and use them appropriately.

Early years skill:Understanding
Early years typical range:22-36m
P-scales/Nat. Curriculum skill:English Listening
P-scales/Nat. Curriculum level:P6
TAP skill:Language Understanding
TAP level:TAP36
Section:Early Years (0-5yrs) info; Primary (5-11yrs) info

If you are having problems with logging into the site, please email us on support@commtap.org. Or alternatively use the contact form - especially if you don't hear back from us, or you didn't get the registration email when you tried to sign up.

Activity/strategy name and materials required How to do the activity Key principles for doing the activity and comments
Act it out

A male doll

A female doll

Appropriately sized objects e.g. cup, ball, plastic item of fruit etc.

1. Check the child can identify which is the male doll and which is the female.

2. Ask the child to suggest words we can use instead of saying 'the boy/the girl' or using the person's name. - tell them if they can't think of it.

3. Explain that you're going to describe one of the dolls doing something and you want the child to act it out using the right doll.

4. Give a description using the word 'he' or 'she' e.g. "he is running" or "she is eating".

5. Help the child to act it out if they are struggling.

6. After a few turns, swap roles so the child has a turn to talk

Try to find dolls which are very obviously male and female. For younger children use rag dolls or action man and Barbie (or similar). For older children, plastic action figures may be more appropriate.

Make sure you only use 'he' and 'she' in what you're saying (not 'him' and 'her').

For children who can read, using two cards, one that says 'he' and the other that says 'she' can help remind them to use the words.

Say 'he' sentences and 'she' sentences in a random order so the child can't predict which you'll choose next.

Use role reversal to encourage the child to use the pronouns. "You be in charge"

Paper doll dress up

1. First you need to print out a page that has 2 bodies on it, a page with a selection of hairstyles and several pages with a range of different clothes

2. Select a boy's hairstyle, cut it out and stick it on one of the bodies, then select a girl's hairstyle, cut it out and stick it on the other body. This makes one a boy and the other a girl. There is no need to cut the bodies out.

3. Cut out all the clothes. Shoes and socks are probably best left in pairs

4. Check the child can identify which is the male doll and which is the female.

5. Ask the child to suggest words we can use instead of saying 'the boy/the girl' or using the person's name. - tell them if they can't think of it.

6. Explain that you're going to dress the children in the picture.

7. Say what the children in the picture should put on, e.g. "he wants blue trousers", "she needs a t-shirt" etc.

8. Help the child to act it out if they are struggling.

9. after a few turns, swap roles so the child has a turn to talk

Choose hairstyles which are obviously for a boy and a girl, rather than unisex ones.

You can laminate the sheets to make them more durable.

If the child is struggling to find the item of clothing you name, try sorting the clothes into piles e.g. 'T-shirts' and 'shoes'

You can put blue-tack on the back of the clothes to ensure they don't move around when the child puts them on the picture.

Make sure you only use 'he' and 'she' in what you're saying (not 'him' and 'her').

For children who can read, using two cards, one that says 'he' and the other that says 'she' can help remind them to use the words.

Say 'he' sentences and 'she' sentences in a random order so the child can't predict which you'll choose next.

Use role reversal to encourage the child to use the pronouns. "You be in charge"

Picture sort 1

Pictures of people doing various actions (e.g. LDA, Colorcards, Flash-Pro, internet image searches, photos, etc.)

A male doll

A female doll

two cards, one that says 'he' and the other that says 'she'

Make sure you have a mixture of males and females in your pictures.

You could take photos of the children in the child's class doing various actions. This could lead into an activity making a book about the class doing various activities (e.g. "this is Selina. She is reading" etc.)

Picture sort 2

Cards with the words "he" and "she" and appropriate pictures on them (e.g. Boardmaker)

Pictures of males and females (e.g. action pictures)

2 sorting rings or boxes, or other containers

Avoid using pictures of more than one person.

Avoid using pictures of babies (or other people where the gender is not obvious).

Make sure you do "he" and "she" randomly, so the child can't predict what will come next

Picture sort 3

Cards with the words "he" and "she" and appropriate pictures on them (e.g. Boardmaker)

Pairs of pictures of males and females carrying out the same action (e.g. from Flash-pro)

2 sorting rings or boxes, or other containers

Avoid using pictures of more than one person.

Avoid using pictures of babies (or other people where the gender is not obvious).

Make sure you do "he" and "she" randomly, so the child can't predict what will come next

Can you find me?

Two small cards, one with a picture of a girl on it and the other with a picture of a boy on it

Places to hide the boy and girl cards, for example behind flaps in a flap book (such as "Where's Spot?")

Instead of the above you can use "Can You Find Me?" by Donald Smith (Published by Tango Books) which has a double-sided figure of a child (one side a boy, one side a girl) which can be hidden under various flaps.

If the child needs to practice using "she", make sure you use the girl picture more often. If the child needs to practice using "he", use the boy picture more.

If the child does not use the correct form ("he" or "she"), feedback the correct form in a conversational way, for example "oh, he wasn't in the log then?"

Remember when it is your go, you do the talking so the child gets practice at listening to the correct language.

Actions with miniatures and prompt cards

Set of simple action pictures where you have two cards for each action with a boy on one card and a girl on the other (available from LDA, Black Sheep Press, Derbyshire Language Scheme)

A boy and a girl Playmobil or similar jointed figure.

Any props you need from toys you have available (e.g. bed, chair, play food, TV etc.)

See comments for making the materials.

You could also use: Clear Products Pictoys set 5 (see www.clear-resources.co.uk)

Swap roles so the child has a chance to practise speaking

Comments on making the materials:

Cards showing different characters doing the same action are available from many sources e.g. LDA, Black Sheep Press (LIP1), Derbyshire Language Scheme.

If you are obliged to draw your own very simple matchstick figures (just add a triangle skirt and pigtails for the girl) it is always quicker to find the accessories first and then draw the pictures! Otherwise you can draw a whole set and waste a lot of time looking for the required toys to demonstrate the action.

You might have dolls house furniture so you can draw he/she is watching TV ; he/she is in the bath; he/she is sleeping; he/she is cooking and so on.

You could also use symbols software to make the pictures.

No comments

Please register or login to post a comment.

Publicity

Ads on this page are provided by Google Adsense - and their presence does not imply any endorsement by Commtap. Report a problem with an ad on this page.