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Language and Communication Using a visual framework to aid story telling  This resource has been viewed by a moderator.

Description:

This page explains how to support your child to use a visual framework to plan and tell a story, or to retell a story.

Early years skill:not specified
Early years typical range:not specified
P-scales/Curriculum skill:English Speaking
P-scales/Curriculum level:L2b
TAP skill:Expressive Language
TAP level:TAP68
Pre/Nat. Curriculum Area:not specified
Pre/Nat. Curiculum Standard:not specified
Section:Primary (5-11yrs) info; Secondary (11-16yrs) info
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Activity/strategy name and materials required How to do the activity Key principles for doing the activity and comments
Retell a story with a story planner

- A simple story planner  - click here to print

- A simple book (one with no words or one sentence per page is good). You could also use a set of 5-6 sequencing cards.

- Pens

1. Explain to your child that they are going to use the story planner to work out what happens in a story. Explain the sections of the planner and what each part means (give an example by telling your own story).

2. Explain that every story needs to have these key points of information.

3. Read the story to them, but do not show them the pictures. You could repeat it.

4. Have each child draw or write the key details on the story planner.

5. Show them the pictures, and let them add any details they missed. Choose one or two children to retell the story to the group.

This can easily be used with an individual child as well.

To make the task easier, let the children see the pictures as you tell the story.

If the writing or drawing is difficult and takes too long, write several key words in each section of the story planner and have the children circle the right ones. (Make sure you include some details that are not from your story, to give them a choice.)

Story Planner

 - story planning template - click here to print. 

   

1. Explain to your child you are going to use a story planner to help make up a story/retell a story.

2. Talk through the different parts of the planner. You may want to use a known story as an example. 

3. Talk through the sections together and add information - this could be written or drawn. You may wish to have some symbols/pictures alongside the story planner to help your child think of ideas.

4. Once you have completed all the sections, encourage your child to tell you the story.

Reporters

Simple picture book

Photocopied pictures of the key details from the book. (If you can shrink them onto one page it is easier to see them all.)

Story planners

pens

1. Divide the children into two groups, or if they are confident, have them work in pairs.

2. One group reads the story (or you read it to them) and makes notes by drawing or writing on the story planner.

3. Go over the pictures of the key details with the other group. Explain that when the other children retell the story, they must tick off every detail they remember to include.

4. Have the first group retell the story, or choose one person to retell it.

5. See how many details they remembered and praise them for it!

This would work well with a pair of children, or with 3 or 4 children.

If the writing or drawing is difficult and takes too long, write several key words in each section of the story planner and have the children circle the right ones. (Make sure you include some details that are not from your story, to give them a choice.)

Guess the Story

Story planners

A set of sequencing pictures for each child and an extra one

A photocopy of each set of pictures - a whole set per page.

1. The children need to have space to work so that they cannot see what each other is doing.

2. Give each child a set of sequencing pictures or a photocopy of a set, and a story planner. Explain that they need to note the key details from their story.

3. Put a photocopy of every set of sequencing pictures in the middle, where everyone can see (including the extra set).

4. The children take it in turns to retell their story using their story planner to help them.

5. The other children must guess which story they are telling from the photocopies in the middle.

You could use two photocopies of each sequence instead of having the actual cards - this cuts down on the amount of paper etc!

If the writing or drawing is difficult and takes too long, write several key words in each section of the story planner and have the children circle the right ones. (Make sure you include some details that are not from your story, to give them a choice.)

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