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Speech move between consonant sounds  This resource has been viewed by a moderator.

Description:

To move between a series of consonant sounds. You seek advice from a Speech and Language Therapist as to which sounds to work on and how many.

Phonology/Articulation:Polysyllables
Section:Early Years (0-5yrs) info; Primary (5-11yrs) info
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Activity/strategy name and materials required How to do the activity Key principles for doing the activity and comments
Car racing game

Materials:

A track drawn out with pictures for target sounds;

Two toy cars;

A pen or pencil.

One child has the racing car. Another person has the 'starting' pen/pencil and another the 'finishing' pen/pencil.

The child puts their car at the beginning of the track. The starting person puts their pen across the track, then says 'ready steady go' and lifts the pen to let the car through.

The child pushes the car along the track, saying the sound for each square they come across. They need to try and move the car as fast as possible whilst still being able to say the sounds/words clearly.

When they get to the end of the track, the finishing person lets the car through the 'finishing' gate.

Variation:

One child says the sounds, and another person pushes the car - they can only push the car on to the next square when they hear the sound/word clearly.

The child must be able to say the sounds/words one at a time (if not this activity is not appropriate).

If the child has difficulty moving from one sound to another they need to go more slowly.

Remember to praise all the child's attempts.

Multi-syllable nonsense words

Materials:

Board with vowel sounds on;

Pack of consonant cards appropriate to the target sounds.

Start off by going through the sounds for the crocodile ( 'aaah'), piglet ( 'eee'), and the cloud ( 'ooo') on the vowel sound board.

Take it in turns to take a consonant card, and put it in a space before any one of the vowels. Say the consonant and its following vowel separately then together, for example "puh - ah - pah" .

When a line is completed, you must say the whole line, e.g. "par-kar-tar".

The game is finished when all the spaces are full up.

When it is your go, you should say the sounds rather than getting the child to say the sounds, this way they get opportunities to hear how the sounds should go together as well as practicing doing it themselves.

Word lists for multi-syllable games below

3 syllable words

fingernail

ponytail

skeleton

butterfly

chimpanzee

dinosaur

elephant

gorilla

jellyfish

octopus

pelican

polar bear

banana

cereal

chocolate

lasagne

orange juice

potato

raspberry

spaghetti

4 or more syllables

alligator

caterpillar

hippopotamus

rhinoceros

baked potato

cauliflower

chicken noodle soup

mashed potatoes

peanut butter

helicopter

motorcycle

dictionary

tape recorder

CD player

electric drill

television

toilet paper

vacuum cleaner

washing machine

Pairs game

Materials:

Cards with pictures and words from the above list - two cards for each word

As with the other games, you say the word when it is your go, so that the child gets opportunities to hear how the word is said.

Stepping stones game

Materials:

Stepping stone board

One dice

Counters

Set of cards with words/pictures from the above lists

As with the other games, you say the word when it is your go, so that the child gets opportunities to hear how the word is said.

Snakes and ladders

Snakes and ladders board with about 15 or 20 spaces, two snakes, and two ladders. Each square has a picture/word on it from the above list.

One dice

Counters

As with the other games, you say the word when it is your go, so that the child gets opportunities to hear how the word is said.

Hide the fish

Eight cards with words/pictures from the above list.

Small piece of paper with picture of a fish (or something else) on it.

This game is harder if the names of the pictures are more similar. Turn over the picture that you thought the child had said, though take care not to cause frustration if they have difficulties saying the word correctly to make you understand.

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