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Barts Health NHS Trust (Tower Hamlets) Speech and Language Therapy for Children  

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Organisation (group) page created for/by Barts Health NHS Trust (Tower Hamlets) Speech and Language Therapy for Children.
Description
NHS Speech and Language Therapy Service for children in Tower Hamlets.
The Tower Hamlets speech and language therapy children's service is a team of speech and language therapists, bilingual co-workers and admin support staff, based across Tower Hamlets, delivering speech and language therapy services to children and young people under the age of 19.

The service aims to:

  • Provide diagnostic assessment and management of communication and feeding difficulties for children referred to the service;
  • Provide services to children with a statement of special educational needs specifying speech and language therapy in mainstream schools, specialist resource educational provision and some special schools in the borough of Tower Hamlets, London;
  • Offer service-level agreements to individual schools on request.

Contact Information

Speech & Language Therapy Children’s Service
Hastings Ward, 1st Floor
Mile End Hospital
Bancroft Road
London E1 4DG
Phone: 020 8223 8943
 
15 results

List of pages (most recent first)

Two turns Ask each student in turn "how are you?" - pointing to the "how are you?" prompt card as you do so: point to the the "I'm..." prompt card (and cue in with "I'm..." if necessary). Wait for the student to respond; Let each student take it in turns to ask "how are you" to the others in the group. Three turns Once two turns is mastered as above, move to three turns...
Show the picture on one of the cards to the pupil; Ask the pupil to name the picture; Ask the pupil to say the initial sound. (If you are using letter names, ask the pupil to say the name.); The pupil posts the card through the upper hole in the chute (Take care that the card is the right way up) The card should flip inside the chute and emerge with the letter towards the pupil; The pupil checks...
The chute is a special/fun posting box which is designed for posting cards with something on each side. You post it with one side facing up, and it pops out of the bottom showing the other side. You could use this for phonology work for example, having picture cards with the initial sound written on the back. The pupil says the initial sound for the picture, posts the card and checks if they were right from the card when it comes out the bottom.
How to make the chute You will need:
Start with using just one picture at a time; Have the two sets of pictures face up; Take one picture and put it on the frame in one of the four corner positions; Show the student its matching card; Ask the student to find the matching card on the frame (e.g. "Where's the banana?"); If they look at it, confirm what they have looked at ("Yes! The banana!"), and pair it with the other one, and put...
Ensure that the student already knows how to do the activity - for example that they are able to make toast and spread it. Get them to tell you what to do/show you what to do: initially start with a simplified sequence with 3 or 4 steps (see ideas on the left); Respond to what the student indicates that you should do - but look confused if it won't work - for example if they ask you to put cold...
1. Carry out the sequence without the pictures; 2. Do it again, showing the relevant picture for each part of the activity as you do it; 3. Get the student to do the sequence, showing them a picture for each part of the sequence as they do it; 4. Get them to show you what to do by giving you a picture for each part of the sequence. Try to do exactly as the picture you are given indicates, for...
The motivating thing could be bashing on a musical instrument, blowing bubbles, getting social interaction: the student needs to be motivated by whatever the thing/activity is for this to work - they won't communicate for something they don't want. The motivating thing should be something they can have/do for a short time, e.g. no more than about 20 seconds or so. Check that the student is...
Smiley faces evaluation (word document) This sheet can be used to record progress in a communication skills group (or any other kind of group). The child's ability to do each activity in a session can be rated according to four smiley faces - from finding it very hard to finding it really easy. The idea is that you maintain activities at a level where the child is doing well most of the time in...
Offer a choice of food items, or a choice of a food item and the "boring" item (if the person doesn't mind which food item they get); Ask them what they want giving a choice, e.g. "Would you like some banana or a crisp?" (Stress the underlined words and also sign them); Respond to what you understand the person has communicated - giving them that item. See the comments on the right as to how to...
At a point earlier in the day (preferably at the beginning), go through the activities you will be doing. Put a card down for each activity in order; As you come to each activity in the day, refer the child to the corresponding picture in the timetable; Later in the day - preferably at the end - go through the timetable again; Once the child is familiar with this, see how much of the timetable...
Say to the children what you are going to make - e.g. pizza. Ask them to say what you would need to make a pizza; Write their ideas down, and discuss them - to support those who may have difficulties reading the words, do a rough sketch of each ingredient, or use picture symbols; Decide which ones you need to go to the shop for, and use these to make a shopping list. See comments for variations...
Name of activity/materials Instructions Comments Create the story
1. Carry out the activity without the pictures; 2. Do it again, showing the relevant picture for each part of the activity as you do it; 3. Get the child to do the sequence, tell them what to do by showing them a picture for each part of the sequence; 4. Get them to show you what to do by giving you a picture for each part of the sequence. Try to do exactly as the picture you are given indicates...

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Barts Health NHS Trust (Tower Hamlets) Speech and Language Therapy for Children

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