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Language and Communication identifies sentences in reading and uses full stops  This resource has been viewed by a moderator.

Description:

Recognising sentences in reading

Early years skill:not specified
Early years typical range:not specified
P-scales/Nat. Curriculum skill:English Reading
P-scales/Nat. Curriculum level:L1a
TAP skill:Reading
TAP level:TAP60
Section:Primary (5-11yrs) info; Secondary (11-16yrs) info
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Activity/strategy name and materials required How to do the activity Key principles for doing the activity and comments
Recognising sentences in reading

Write or type lines of text - perhaps from books the child has read. Some of these should be complete sentences. Some of them should be unfinished sentences so they don't make sense. Start all with a capital letter, but leave out the full stop from all of them.

Cut out each line of text so each one is on a separate card or piece of paper.

(You could keep an extra copy with the correct punctuation added as a model.)

Examples:

The boy is in bed

At the weekend

It is time to go

My house is in a

Easylearn produce prepared texts in a book called 'First Stop'

www.easylearn.co.uk

1. Child / adult read aloud through a selection of lines of text.

2. Child identifies which are complete and make sense (i.e. which lines are full sentences) and which are not.

3. Child sorts the lines of text into two groups - ones that are complete sentences and ones that are not.

4. Adult models re-reading the lines and adding the punctuation - full stops only at the ends of the complete sentences.

5. If the child is ready - let them work on adding full stops at the ends of complete sentences.

The purpose of this activity is for the child to recognise that a sentence has to make sense (and that it isn't just the punctuation that shows it's a sentence).

This could be done one to one, in a pair or in a small group e.g. four children.

Child could check work from a model prepared earlier.

This links to 'cut up' sentences in reading / writing - child reads the words and sequences them to form a sentence.

Identifying sentences and sentence boundaries in longer texts and adding full stops / capital letters

Four slightly longer texts than in the "recognising sentences in reading" activity, e.g. of about 3-4 lines, which you have written out or typed without punctuation.

Example:

it was a hot day the children were making a sandcastle it was really big

Easylearn produce prepared texts in a book called 'First Stop'

www.easylearn.co.uk

The purpose of this activity is for the child to recognise that a sentence has to make sense (and that it isn't just the punctuation that shows it's a sentence).

This could be done one to one or in a pair -or small group e.g. four children.

Punctuation Kung Fu (described in the book Could Do Better by Phil Beadle, www.philbeadle.com), where each punctuation mark is accompanied by a kung fu movement and a noise, could be introduced as part of this activity.

This links to 'cut up' sentences in reading / writing activities - child reads the words and sequences them to form a sentence.

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