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Language and Communication Sequence pictures of familiar routines or a story  This resource has been viewed by a moderator.

Description:

For child to put together a short sequence of pictures to show an activity or event they have been involved with.

Early years skill:Writing
Early years typical range:40-60+m
P-scales/Curriculum skill:English Writing
P-scales/Curriculum level:P8
TAP skill:Writing
TAP level:TAP48
Pre/Nat. Curriculum Area:not specified
Pre/Nat. Curiculum Standard:not specified
Section:Early Years (0-5yrs) info; Primary (5-11yrs) info
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Activity/strategy name and materials required How to do the activity Key principles for doing the activity and comments
Stories using miniatures

Play people, bricks, etc. as required

Can be done 1:1 or in a small group

Suggestions for stories:

1. dad, mum, baby, bike, bricks: dad: bye bye baby, bye, bye mum, etc., gets on bike, drives into bricks, falls off;

2. helicopter rescue: helicopter comes and rescues those on an island;

3. dog eats picnic when others aren't looking;

4. fire!: children spot a fire in a building - make a story about what they do next;

5. swim across crocodile infested river.

1. Show the child a story with the miniatures;

2. Get child to redo the story using the miniatures;

3. With the child make simple drawings for each key part of the story (the drawings do not need to be works of art);

4. Cut the pictures up and get the child to put them back in the right order;

5. Check if the story still works if you follow the sequence of pictures.

The stories can also be physically acted out.

Children can get automatic feedback from this - if the pictures are in the wrong order the stories won't usually work - for example the brick tower can't be knocked down if the picture for it being built hasn't yet been used. Look puzzled when you can't do this bit of the story giving the child the opportunity to try and rectify the problem by re-ordering the pictures.

Any activity sequence in the classroom

For example:

1. getting materials required for an activity;

2. lining up;

3. making a drawing;

4. a simple game you play;

5. going to assembly;

6. turning on and listening to a tape recorder/CD/MP3 player;

7. Switching on a computer and doing something on it;

8. opening a pot of bubbles and blowing them;

9. making a sandwich;

10. (a little more complex): playground games such as 'had', 'hide and seek', 'football'

Materials as required.

1. Do the activity;

2. With the child make simple drawings for each key part of the activity (the drawings do not need to be works of art);

3. Cut the pictures up and get the child to put them back in the right order;

4. Try to follow the sequence of pictures to see if it works.

Children can get automatic feedback from this - if the pictures are in the wrong order the sequence won't usually work. Look puzzled when a bit of the activity can't be done giving the child the opportunity to try and rectify the problem by re-ordering the pictures.

Books

Familiar book

Photocopied pictures

1. Select a book for the child to become familiar with;

2. When they are familiar with the book, select a small number of pictures (for example three) to photocopy for the child to put in the right order;

3. Ask the child to describe the story, using sequencing words (e.g. first, next, beginning, end, last).

As a reward you could allow the child to colour or stick, or to make a book out of pictures to take home.

Picture sequencing

Published sequencing cards (e.g. LDA cards)

Or worksheets with 3-4 picture sequences (Black Sheep have some ready made ones)

1. Explain to the child that the pictures are in the wrong order, and that they need to be put in the right order.

2. Lay out the cards so that they are out of order.

3. Let the child have time to think about what order the pictures should be in.

4. Talk about what is happening in each picture before the child tries to put them in order.

5. Have the child put the pictures into the right order.

6. Ask them to tell you the story.

7. Encourage them to use sequencing language e.g. first, next, last, beginning, end.

If the child is finding it difficult, remind the child of what is happening in each picture.

If the child puts the pictures in the wrong order, tell the story as it is (e.g. The boy gave the flowers to his mum, then he saw the flowers in shop, then he bought the flowers.) Ask the child if the story makes sense.

If the child is still finding it hard, tell them what the first picture is.

You could ask the child to think about what might happen next in the story.

Photocopied pictures from a familiar story

As above

As above

Photo shoot!

Photos of the child doing an everyday activity (i.e. a sequence of them)

1. Explain to the child that the pictures are in the wrong order, and that they need to be put in the right order.

2. Lay out the cards so that they are out of order.

3. Let the child have time to think about what order the pictures should be in.

4. Talk about what is happening in each picture before the child tries to put them in order.

5. Have the child put the pictures into the right order.

6. Ask them to tell you the story.

7. Encourage them to use sequencing language e.g. first, next, last, beginning, end.

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