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Speech Activities for counting syllables in words  This resource has been viewed by a moderator.

Description:

These activities help your child to develop the skill of counting syllables in words. Understanding and being able to count syllables is a phonological awareness activity – please see attached information sheet about phonological awareness and what working on this area can help with click here for information sheet - What is phonological awareness?

Phonology/Articulation:Syllables and Words
Section:Early Years (0-5yrs) info; Primary (5-11yrs) info
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Activity/strategy name and materials required How to do the activity Key principles for doing the activity and comments
Syllable Clapping

- A mixture of words/objects containing different amounts of syllables. 

Printable syllable picture cards are available here

1. Explain to your child that you are going to think about the number of syllables (beats) in words.

2. Say your name. Then repeat your name, but clap each syllable as you say it. 

3. Do the same for your child's name.

4. Ask your child to suggest the names of people they know, or objects around them. Clap out the syllables while you say the word together.

5. Move on to using pictures and/or objects. Ask the child to choose a picture and clap out the syllables. You could carry out this task with any turn taking game, i.e. clap out syllables in a word, then have a turn at the game.

If your child is finding this task challenging, work on one and two syllable words first before introducing longer words. 

If your child is happy for you to do so, you can gently place your hands over theirs to show them when to clap.

Counting syllables with bricks

- A mixture of words/objects containing different amounts of syllables. 

Printable syllable picture cards are available here

- Building bricks

- Optional syllable counting strip - print here or you can make your own.

 

1. Place the syllable pictures face down in a pile. Explain to your child you are going to turn a picture over and work out how many beats/syllables the word has by counting them with bricks.

2. It may help to use a syllable counting strip to place the bricks on - see materials for a print out of this.

3. Count out the bricks as you are saying the word - encourage your child to have a turn. 

4. Instead of placing the bricks in a line, you could build a tower.

 

 

 

If your child is finding this task challenging, work on one and two syllable words first before introducing longer words. 

If your child is happy for you to do so, you can gently place your hands over theirs to show them when to clap.

Syllable Puzzle

1. Print and cut out a selection of the syllable resources.

2. Choose 4-5 different puzzles and spread them face down in front of you.

3. Each take a turn at choosing a piece to build the puzzles. The first person to complete the puzzle says the word and works out how many syllabes it has.

4. The winner is the person who completes the most puzzles.

If your child is finding this task challenging, work on one and two syllable words first before introducing longer words. 

If your child is happy for you to do so, you can gently place your hands over theirs to show them when to clap.

Syllable Sorting

- A mixture of words/objects containing different amounts of syllables. 

Printable syllable picture cards are available here

- Printable syllable sorting cards

1. Prepare a selction of pictures/object which have different numbers of syllables.

2. Print out the syllable sorting cards, or make your own.

3. Take turns at choosing an object/picture and working out how many syllabes it has and placing it on the correct syllable sorting card.

 

If your child is finding this task challenging, work on one and two syllable words first before introducing longer words. 

If your child is happy for you to do so, you can gently place your hands over theirs to show them when to clap.

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